Financial Times - Lexiconhttp://lexicon.ft.comTerm of the Day from the Financial Times Lexiconen(PICS-1.1 "http://www.classify.org/safesurf/" L gen true for "http://www.ft.com/" r (SS~~000 1))&copy The Financial Times Ltd 2014 'FT' and 'Financial Times' are trademarks of The Financial Times Ltd. See http://www.ft.com/servicestools/help/terms#legal1 for the terms and conditions of reuse.client.support@ft.comTue, 16 Jun 2009 01:42:55 +0100Sat, 23 Aug 2014 11:19:18 GMTNewspapers15http://lexicon.ft.comhttp://lexicon.ft.comFinancial Timeshttp://im.media.ft.com/m/img/rss/RSS_Default_Image.gifhttp://lexicon.ft.compraise sandwichhttp://lexicon.ft.com/Term?term=praise sandwich<p>A technique used, generally at work, to reduce any unpleasantness when giving someone negative feedback. This is done by praising the individual, then stating the criticism and ending with some compliments. </p> <p><a title="The ‘praise sandwich’ is stale but still edible - FT.com" href="http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/7a441aca-c61a-11e3-9839-00144feabdc0.html" target="_blank">Advocates of the technique</a> say that this builds trust, makes people more receptive to criticism and surmounts a managerial terror of bluntness. But <a title="The " href="http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/04/the-sandwich-approach-undermin/">critics</a> argue that it is manipulative, confusing and obstructs timely feedback by obliging managers to store up nice things to say to cushion the bad stuff. </p> <p> </p> <h2>praise sandwich in the news</h2> <p>In June 2011, the FT writer Tim Harford wrote the <a href="http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/8817953e-8bf1-11e0-854c-00144feab49a.html" target="_blank">praise sandwich is a criticism made palatable</a> because it is concealed between two layers of praise. For example, "I think this is really good, creative work. It would be wonderful if you could [insert important feedback here]. But overall, as I say, it’s really very good."</p> <p>He said the technique works because of what the behavioural economist Richard Thaler calls "hedonic editing". As losses are far more painful than gains, it is worth bundling losses together with larger gains – if one receives a tax refund of £150 but lose £10 in the street, hedonic editing is the process of rolling the two together for a net £140 gain.</p> <p>Mr Harford stated that the praise sandwich deploys the same principle: it allows people to save face. Yet as a feedback technique it is risky: the sandwiched-between praise may be lost in the whole. He gave an example: "You say, 'It’s excellent, but you need to fix …'. I hear 'It is broadly excellent'. I feel better, but I will not become better." <span></span></p>Fri, 22 Aug 2014 18:17:01 +0100<p>A technique used, generally at work, to reduce any unpleasantness when giving someone negative feedback. This is done by praising the individual, then stating the criticism and ending with some compliments. [ref url=""]Wai Kwen Chan[/ref]</p> <p><a title="The &lsquo;praise sandwich&rsquo; is stale but still edible - FT.com" href="http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/7a441aca-c61a-11e3-9839-00144feabdc0.html" target="_blank">Advocates of the technique</a> say that this builds trust, makes people more receptive to criticism and surmounts a managerial terror of bluntness. But&nbsp;<a title="The " href="http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/04/the-sandwich-approach-undermin/">critics</a>&nbsp;argue that it is manipulative, confusing and obstructs timely feedback by obliging managers to store up nice things to say to cushion the bad stuff. [ref url=""]Adam Jones[/ref]</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2>praise sandwich in the news</h2> <p>In June 2011, the FT writer Tim Harford wrote the <a href="http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/8817953e-8bf1-11e0-854c-00144feab49a.html" target="_blank">praise sandwich is a criticism made palatable</a> because it is concealed between two layers of praise. For example, "I think this is really good, creative work. It would be wonderful if you could [insert important feedback here]. But overall, as I say, it&rsquo;s really very good."</p> <p>He said the technique works because of what the behavioural economist Richard Thaler calls "hedonic editing". As losses are far more painful than gains, it is worth bundling losses together with larger gains &ndash; if one receives a tax refund of &pound;150 but lose &pound;10 in the street, hedonic editing is the process of rolling the two together for a net &pound;140 gain.</p> <p>Mr Harford stated that the praise sandwich deploys the same principle: it allows people to save face. Yet as a feedback technique it is risky: the sandwiched-between praise may be lost in the whole. He gave an example: "You say, 'It&rsquo;s excellent, but you need to fix &hellip;'. I hear 'It is broadly excellent'. I feel better, but I will not become better."&nbsp;<span>[ref url=""]Tim Harford[/ref]</span></p>