Financial Times - Lexiconhttp://lexicon.ft.comTerm of the Day from the Financial Times Lexiconen(PICS-1.1 "http://www.classify.org/safesurf/" L gen true for "http://www.ft.com/" r (SS~~000 1))&copy The Financial Times Ltd 2016 'FT' and 'Financial Times' are trademarks of The Financial Times Ltd. See http://www.ft.com/servicestools/help/terms#legal1 for the terms and conditions of reuse.client.support@ft.comTue, 16 Jun 2009 01:42:55 +0100Mon, 08 Feb 2016 16:00:19 GMTNewspapers15http://lexicon.ft.comhttp://lexicon.ft.comFinancial Timeshttp://im.media.ft.com/m/img/rss/RSS_Default_Image.gifhttp://lexicon.ft.comdead cat bouncehttp://lexicon.ft.com/Term?term=dead cat bounce<p>Financial market jargon for when the market recovers sharply from a steep fall but the rebound is due more to technical factors, like short-covering, than fundamentals (a dead cat will "bounce" if dropped from a high place). Later the market resumes its downward trend. The derivation of the term is said by some to have come from a<a title="word spy on dead cat bounce" href="http://www.wordspy.com/words/deadcatbounce.asp" target="_blank">Financial Times story in 1985</a> in which a broker interviewed about a modest recovery in the Singapore and Kuala Lumpur stock markets described the rise as "dead cat bounce". A similar slang expression is said to exist in some Chinese dialects and could be the origin of the term.</p> <p> </p> <h2>dead cat bounce in the news</h2> <p>In December 2012 a Financial Times columnist looked back at his<a title="The one useful piece of knowledge - FT.com" href="http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/0cc0c3cc-4619-11e2-b780-00144feabdc0.html" target="_blank"> commentary on market events</a> over the preceding year. He said he had been right to identify May's short-lived rally, inspired by the European Central Bank's long-term loan facility as a dead cat bounce.</p>Fri, 10 May 2013 16:46:30 +0100<p>Financial market jargon for when the market recovers sharply from a steep fall but the rebound is due more to technical factors, like short-covering, than fundamentals (a dead cat will "bounce" if dropped from a high place). Later the market resumes its downward trend. The derivation of the term is said by some to have come from a<a title="word spy on dead cat bounce" href="http://www.wordspy.com/words/deadcatbounce.asp" target="_blank">Financial Times story in 1985</a>&nbsp;in which a broker interviewed about a modest recovery in the Singapore and Kuala Lumpur stock markets described the rise as "dead cat bounce". A similar slang expression is said to exist in some Chinese dialects and could be the origin of the term.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2>dead cat bounce in the news</h2> <p>In December 2012 a Financial Times columnist looked back at his<a title="The one useful piece of knowledge - FT.com" href="http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/0cc0c3cc-4619-11e2-b780-00144feabdc0.html" target="_blank"> commentary on market events</a> over the preceding year. He said he had been right to identify May's short-lived rally, inspired by the European Central Bank's long-term loan facility as a dead cat bounce.</p>