Financial Times - Lexiconhttp://lexicon.ft.comTerm of the Day from the Financial Times Lexiconen(PICS-1.1 "http://www.classify.org/safesurf/" L gen true for "http://www.ft.com/" r (SS~~000 1))&copy The Financial Times Ltd 2014 'FT' and 'Financial Times' are trademarks of The Financial Times Ltd. See http://www.ft.com/servicestools/help/terms#legal1 for the terms and conditions of reuse.client.support@ft.comTue, 16 Jun 2009 01:42:55 +0100Mon, 24 Nov 2014 12:41:13 GMTNewspapers15http://lexicon.ft.comhttp://lexicon.ft.comFinancial Timeshttp://im.media.ft.com/m/img/rss/RSS_Default_Image.gifhttp://lexicon.ft.comhard labourhttp://lexicon.ft.com/Term?term=hard labour<p>The term "hard labour" can be used to describe the pressures experienced by parents in dual earner relationships, who are combining paid work with the rearing of infant children. The idea of hard labour encompasses the physical and emotional work involved in looking after babies and pre-school children when both partners are pursuing careers and balancing sleepless nights and the needs of very young children with their paid work. Over the years research has shown that women, while often deeply committed to motherhood, may also be highly work-orientated – often more so than previously supposed.</p> <p>In attempting to do the best for their children, at the same time as working to a high standard, many employed mothers feel conflicted. This is exacerbated for the majority of mothers in heterosexual relationships who also find themselves carrying the lion’s share of housework – the laundry, cleaning and so on.</p> <p><span> Fathers, on the other hand, may be more child-oriented than most employers imagine. While they may be highly work-oriented, fathers are becoming increasingly engaged with children’s lives (though not necessarily with housework) and might wish to work flexibly. Yet even today, despite flexible working policies supposedly aimed at "parents", fathers often find that line-managers assume that such policies are available only to women.</span></p> <p><span>Parental desire to engage with children and progress careers in these circumstances may be stressful – hence the term "hard labour" to describe the pressures of combining paid work with child-rearing in the infant years. </span></p> <p> </p> <h2>hard labour in the news</h2> <p>In the Financial Times MBA blog ‘Parenthood and the MBA, (July 25 2011), Abhishek Ramanathan considers the trials of <a title="Parenthood and the MBA - FT.com" href="http://blogs.ft.com/mba-blog/2011/07/25/parenthood-and-the-mba/" target="_blank">combining parenthood with study</a> and observes the pressures of trying to do both the role of parent and business administration student to a high standard.</p>Mon, 17 Jun 2013 17:27:18 +0100<p>The term "hard labour" can be used to describe the pressures experienced by parents in dual earner relationships, who are combining paid work with the rearing of infant children. The idea of hard labour encompasses the physical and emotional work involved in looking after babies and pre-school children when both partners are pursuing careers and balancing sleepless nights and the needs of very young children with their paid work. Over the years research has shown that women, while often deeply committed to motherhood, may also be highly work-orientated &ndash; often more so than previously supposed.</p> <p>In attempting to do the best for their children, at the same time as working to a high standard, many employed mothers feel conflicted. This is exacerbated for the majority of mothers in heterosexual relationships who also find themselves carrying the lion&rsquo;s share of housework &ndash; the laundry, cleaning and so on.</p> <p><span> Fathers, on the other hand, may be more child-oriented than most employers imagine. While they may be highly work-oriented, fathers are becoming increasingly engaged with children&rsquo;s lives (though not necessarily with housework) and might wish to work flexibly. Yet even today, despite flexible working policies supposedly aimed at "parents", fathers often find that line-managers assume that such policies are available only to women.</span></p> <p><span>Parental desire to engage with children and progress careers in these circumstances may be stressful &ndash; hence the term "hard labour" to describe the pressures of combining paid work with child-rearing in the infant years.[ref url=""]<span>Dr Caroline Gatrell, Senior Lecturer, Management Learning and Leadership, Lancaster University</span>[/ref] </span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2>hard labour in the news</h2> <p>In the Financial Times MBA blog &lsquo;Parenthood and the MBA, (July 25 2011), Abhishek Ramanathan considers the trials of <a title="Parenthood and the MBA - FT.com" href="http://blogs.ft.com/mba-blog/2011/07/25/parenthood-and-the-mba/" target="_blank">combining parenthood with study</a> and observes the pressures of trying to do both the role of parent and business administration student to a high standard.</p>